Can the Water Be Made Fine? Southern Politics and Women. Primaries, Prohibition, the Negro Question and Remedy. William Henry Gravely.

Can the Water Be Made Fine? Southern Politics and Women. Primaries, Prohibition, the Negro Question and Remedy.

[Roanoke, Va. Copyright by William Henry Gravely, 1921. First edition. Small 8vo, original printed gray wrappers, 31 pages. Wrappers a bit sunned and soiled; a very good copy. Item #14980

In the wake of the passage of the 19th Amendment (which Virginia had rejected in 1920), the Virginia attorney and Republican-Populist politician here tries to square the Southern political circle: "The necessity for a change in the machinery of party government is especially acute in Southern Republican politics at this time. Any considerable additions to the membership of that party must be drawn chiefly from working men and women. These will not attend mass meetings in which the presence of negroes is feared." Gravely suggests allowing proportional representation in Congress from both African Americans and whites--with the whites continuing to hold all the political patronage back home: "The point is that negro office-holding in the Southern states is an utter impossibility. It should be prohibited except as to those positions where there is no chance of disagreeable contact, especially with white women."

Price: $75.00

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