The Long Island Farmer Poet. On Seeing His Own Likeness [caption title]. Bloodgood Cutter, aviland.

The Long Island Farmer Poet. On Seeing His Own Likeness [caption title].

Little Neck, L. I. n. p., 1862. First edition. Broadside, approx. 7 x 3 inches. Woodcut portrait vignette of Cutter at the head of the slip. Small portion torn from the lower margin; laid paper showing browning to the verso and some offset from inclusion in a scrapbook; in very good condition. Item #15722

"My friends this likeness of my mortal form, Preserve as a keep-sake when I am gone; That is, when death lays low my weary head, And consigns me to the mansions of the dead." On the utility of this woodcut portrait as something of a memento mori and an inventive to piety--or as Cutter would have it, "When severe pains run through my aching head, Admonish me I'll soon lie with the dead." One of the foremost sweet singers of the 19th century, Cutter is of course best remembered as one of Twain's Quaker City travelers to the Holy Land, christened by Twain the "poet lariat" of the journey; through a shrewd amalgam of atrocious verse, homespun demeanor, and shameless self-promotion (he evidently pressed his slip ballads on anybody who chanced within reach) Cutter achieved the status of a curiosity in his lifetime.

Price: $75.00

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