The Rambler is a History in a Unique Form, it Gives No Advice but Carries a Warning that Parents May Profit By . . . [wrapper title]. Prison Mendicant, Al Hagan.

The Rambler is a History in a Unique Form, it Gives No Advice but Carries a Warning that Parents May Profit By . . . [wrapper title].

(Sacramento, Calif. Chas. N. Fleming, Co.), [ca. mid-1930s]. First edition. 16mo, original pictorial wrappers, [12] pages. Slight crease to the upper wrapper, some toning and light dust-soiling; a very good copy. Item #17152

"We often worked Confederate bills, And sometimes, phoney rings, So I became acquainted with, The Big House at Sing Sing." Ephemeral verses from a California serial criminal offender who bounced around various prisons from the late 1890s through the early 1920s and who has since gone straight. With a slug on the back noting, "Thank You Friend May You Always Have the Price," suggesting Hagan may have peddled these himself on the street as a semi-mendicant piece. (We have handled another copy of this title that notes, "These Poems Have all Been Chosen From Island Lantern and Other Prison Publications"--the Island Lantern was published at McNeil Island Penitentiary in Washington.).

Price: $150.00