Proceedings of he Association for Preserving Liberty and Property Against Republicans and Levellers. Number I . . . [caption title; later numbers with the cation title:] Liberty and Property Preserved Against Republicans and Levellers. A Collection of Tracts. Number II [through Number V]. Association for Preserving Liberty, Property against Republicans and Levellers.

Proceedings of he Association for Preserving Liberty and Property Against Republicans and Levellers. Number I . . . [caption title; later numbers with the cation title:] Liberty and Property Preserved Against Republicans and Levellers. A Collection of Tracts. Number II [through Number V].

[London: J. Sewell? 1792-1793]. Perhaps first edition of each number. 5 numbers extracted together from a nonce volume, still bound together with traces of calf along the spine, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16 pages. General title lacking, presumably not printed (along with the prelims) until the completion of the first volume of these serial tracts and association papers, which ran for 24 numbers; the first number here with the gathering signature B, in 8s; the remaining tracts all with gathering signature A, in 8s. Traces of old calf spine and a bit of brown wrapper adhering to the gutter of the first page; some general light browning and wear; in very good condition. Item #18065

The proceedings of the first number (of the organizational meeting at the Crown and Anchor Tavern on Nov. 20, 1792) appears per ESTC to have been published also as a 4 pp. folio and an 8 pp. octavo. Ephemeral tracts published serially by the counterrevolutionary organization; per the DNB entry on the organizer John Reeves, “On his return to London about 10 November 1792 Reeves was alarmed by the seditious activity which, in his view, threatened to undermine the constitution and government. On 20 November 1792 he established the Association for Preserving Liberty and Property against Republicans and Levellers at the Crown and Anchor tavern in the Strand, installing himself as chairman. Similar associations instituted throughout the country had an immediate impact in suppressing radical agitation [N.B., evidently by breaking up public meetings and attacking print shops publishing Thomas Paine]. The final meeting of the Crown and Anchor association took place on 21 June 1793. Reeves was hailed as having saved the country from revolution.” In addition to an account of the organizing meeting and subsequent resolutions, there is much in these tracts by way of imaginary dialogues between a Labourer and Gentleman, an open letter from John Bull, and attacks in prose and verse against Thomas Paine abounding: “First Thomas declares we’re all equal, / Not an atom of diff’rence between us; / That is, if you mark but the sequel, / An old maid’s as handsome as Venus.” A few author attributions made in later pencil.

Price: $350.00