Two autograph letters to Ionia, Michigan pioneer and Massachusetts native Osmond Tower (1811-1886), one from his brother-in-law Arunah Bartlett and sister Amanda; another from his sister Louisa. Michigan, Arunah Bartlett, Amanda Bartlett, Louisa, Massachusetts, Tower, later Dexter Tower.

Two autograph letters to Ionia, Michigan pioneer and Massachusetts native Osmond Tower (1811-1886), one from his brother-in-law Arunah Bartlett and sister Amanda; another from his sister Louisa.

Cummington, Mass., January 29, 1841 & Goshen [Mass.], Sept. 17th, 1845. Stampless covers, the first 3.25 pages plus integral address, 12.5 x 7.63 inches, approx. 1250 words; the second 1 page plus integral address, 10 x 8 inches, approx. 185 words. The first letter splitting along old folds, some contemporary and later soiling, but legible and in good condition; the second letter slightly soiled but in very good condition. Item #18778

The first letter from Arunah and Amanda includes news of Amanda’s jaundice, their worries over the lack of news from brother Ambrose, discusses deaths of acquaintances, and Arunah discusses the recent political excitement of the 1840 election by way of inquiring after Osmond’s scanty recent correspondence—with allusion to the Harrison hard cider campaign (and the wildcat banks of Michigan): “It is so very long since we have had so much as one word from you or Ambrose that we have got quite out of patience on the subject and begin to fear that some wild varmint has made his way within doors and used up the whole family whigs and all, but if you have out lived the ravages of the Wild Cats and other bank animals you will use means to keep clear of them for the future, and let us know how you get along. We have had a terrible display of coon skins and squirrel skins sider [sic] barrels and the like but hope the office seeking mummery is done with for the present. I hope that when our Nebuchadnezzar rulers get stationed at the helm thay [sic] ‘ll throw off their beastly disposition and act for [the] good of Nation. . . . Alden tades [for trades?] and makes shingle, attends debates &c &c is a stiff whig makes the pamphlet that he received from you the basses [sic] of his arguments in politicks he and his Father stand in battle array on the subject.” Osmond’s sister Amanda hints at a family business in textiles in Massachusetts: “I am sorry you have not some of our flannel for your family especially for the children and some of our fulled cloth for Osmond it was dressed very nicely dressed blue black we had nearly 60 yards Arunah said the other [day] if he could send you a roll of it was easy as he could a snowball over the house you should soon have it it is very cheap, hardly fetching one dollar wool is rising.” Amanda further notes that the family owes Osmond some clothing since “There is one circumstance connected with Lester’s death that I ought to explain to you. You doubtless remember dressing his lifeless form in one of your own garments which ought to have been replaced by another this circumstance never once occurred to my mind till Mother mentioned it to me long after you had gone home.” The second letter notes an upcoming sibling wedding in Goshen and hopes Osmond can come back from Michigan to attend. Louisa married late in life to John Dexter, whose father Samuel Dexter had founded Ionia in 1836; the village was platted in 1841. With preliminary transcripts.

Price: $200.00