An Address Delivered at a General Meeting of the Citizens of the City of New York, held at Tammany Hall, December 28th, 1829. To Express their Sentiments on the Memorials to Congress to Prevent the Transportation of the Mail, and the Opening of the Post Offices on Sunday. Postal Reform, Barnabas Bates.

An Address Delivered at a General Meeting of the Citizens of the City of New York, held at Tammany Hall, December 28th, 1829. To Express their Sentiments on the Memorials to Congress to Prevent the Transportation of the Mail, and the Opening of the Post Offices on Sunday.

New-York: Printed at the Office of the Gospel Herald, 1830. First edition. Unbound stitched pamphlet, 7.5 x 4.88 inches, 12 pages, untrimmed. Paper uniformly toned, with some dust-soiling; a little light foxing; a very good copy. Item #18937

“I see around me men of all sects, who, however they may differ on some points of religious belief, yet cordially unite in maintaining the equal rights of all, and who will give their aid to a measure which goes to support the religious liberty of every man, whether orthodox or heretical, whether a believer or an unbeliever.” A characteristic call for liberty of conscience in regard to the transportation of the U.S. mails; Bates (1785-1853) was a long-time advocate of postal reform and the penny post, though somewhat overshadowed by his more militant counterpart, Lysander Spooner. OCLC (3/2019) notes five locations, four of these in New York.

Price: $350.00

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