Trial of Frederick Eberle and Others, at a Nisi Prius Court, held at Philadelphia, July 1816 . . . for Illegally Conspiring Together by all means Lawful and Unlawful, "With their Bodies and Lives," to Prevent the Introduction of the English Language into the Service of St. Michael's and Zion's Churches, Belonging to the German Lutheran Congregation, in the City of Philadelphia. Taken in Short Hand by James Carson, Attorney at Law. Immigration, Frederick Eberle, defendants, Assimilation.
Trial of Frederick Eberle and Others, at a Nisi Prius Court, held at Philadelphia, July 1816 . . . for Illegally Conspiring Together by all means Lawful and Unlawful, "With their Bodies and Lives," to Prevent the Introduction of the English Language into the Service of St. Michael's and Zion's Churches, Belonging to the German Lutheran Congregation, in the City of Philadelphia. Taken in Short Hand by James Carson, Attorney at Law.

Trial of Frederick Eberle and Others, at a Nisi Prius Court, held at Philadelphia, July 1816 . . . for Illegally Conspiring Together by all means Lawful and Unlawful, "With their Bodies and Lives," to Prevent the Introduction of the English Language into the Service of St. Michael's and Zion's Churches, Belonging to the German Lutheran Congregation, in the City of Philadelphia. Taken in Short Hand by James Carson, Attorney at Law.

Philadelphia: Published for the Reporter, 1817. First edition. 12mo, modern library glazed buckram, 240 pages. Closed tears to old creases to several leaves, but with no loss of text; cheap paper stock somewhat foxed throughout, some light soiling; in very good condition. Item #19531

"I attended their meeting in the Northern Liberties once; I believe in December late--Frederick Eberle was chairman, another man was secretary, and Christian L. Mannhardt, speaker. It was begun with a couple of verses that they sung, and a prayer. After this, Mannhardt got up and kept an oration. Says he, 'Brethren, they want to steal our property, to rob our Churches--they have associated themselves into a society--their articles were, that they take in Irishmen, Frenchmen, Englishmen, and even black men to their Churches, and we shall oppose them with all our bodily strength. . . . When I walked into the school room, a person struck me on the elbow, and I said, is this the way to behave like Christians? I was carrying a pitcher of beer to the Judges of the election, and some beer like to have come into my face--and it was so dangerous, that about 6 o'clock, I went home, I was afraid something would occur." Extensive testimony and material in a clash over class, language, and assimilation among the German immigrant population of Philadelphia; the wealthier classes of the German Lutheran congregation of St. Michael's and Zion's sought to introduce English into some of the services in addition to German--a change resisted by the artisan and working-class congregants, who allegedly used violence and intimidation at the polls in 1816 to thwart the pro-English party's control of the church. See Friederike Baer, The Trial of Frederick Eberle: Language, Patriotism and Citizenship in Philadelphia's German Community, 1790 to 1830 (NYU Press, 2008). Sabin 21750. An ex-library copy, with the light violet ink stamp of the Association of the Bar Library of the City of New York to the title page and an autograph ink accession number to the verso of the title. Contemporary ink ownership signature at the head of the title.

Price: $450.00