The Married Woman’s Private Medical Companion, Embracing the Treatment of Menstruation, or Monthly Turns, During their Stoppage, Irregularity, or Entire Suppression. Pregnancy [versus “Pregnacy” seen in other issues], and How it May be Determined . . . Office, 129 Liberty street [versus “steert,” as is seen in earlier issues]. A. M. Mauriceau, Charles R. Lohman or Joseph F. Trow i e.

The Married Woman’s Private Medical Companion, Embracing the Treatment of Menstruation, or Monthly Turns, During their Stoppage, Irregularity, or Entire Suppression. Pregnancy [versus “Pregnacy” seen in other issues], and How it May be Determined . . . Office, 129 Liberty street [versus “steert,” as is seen in earlier issues].

New York: [n. p], 1850. A new printing from the plates of the 1847 first edition. 12mo, original discreet blind-stamped unlettered black cloth, xiii, [1], 238 pages. Corners rubbed and bumped; some light foxing throughout (a bit heavier in the prelims); spine a trifle faded; a very good copy. Item #19800

“In France, and on the Continent of Europe generally, a covering (used by the male), called a *baudruche* (known as the French Secret), is used with success, with the view of preventing pregnancy. . . . Address Dr. A. M. Mauriceau, Box ‘1224,’ N. Y. City, who will send them by mail to any part of the United States. Price $5 a dozen.” An important popular early American book on contraception and abortion that went through numerous printings, this early example appearing shortly after New York’s foremost abortion provider had served a term in jail; ads in the columns of the New York Daily Herald by June 1, 1850 advertise this title as in its tenth edition. (A sixth edition had been advertised in the Herald as late as November, 1849, “24,000 copies having already been disposed of.”) Charles Lohman’s wife Ann Lohman was the New York City abortion provider who operated from about 1837 from an address on Greenwich Street (just around the corner from 129 Liberty Street) under the name of Madame Restell. Janet Brodie’s Contraception and Abortion in Nineteenth Century America (Ithaca 1994) notes the intersection of anti-abortion prosecution and entrepreneurial contraception sales, explaining that, “in 1847, while Restell was in prison, either her husband [Charles R. Lohman] or Joseph F. Trow [whose name appears on the copyright page], her brother; or both went into the reproductive control business using the alias ‘Dr. A. M. Mariceau.’ . . . Primarily an inducement to readers to send money for secret remedies and to come to the Liberty Street address for abortions, it offered remedies through the mail or in person.” New York did not legislate against abortion until 1846, and the Lohman home was mobbed in February of that year; Ann was arrested and charged with manslaughter in September, 1847 and imprisoned through early 1849. (Newspaper accounts of her life published after her suicide in April, 1878 include accounts her husband visiting her on Blackwell’s Island under the name of Dr. Mauriceau.) This work, which was advertised in newspapers across America through the 1840s and 1850s for a dollar (plus postage) makes moral and medical arguments in favor of contraception, and offers for sale at Mariceau’s Liberty Street address in New York contraceptive devices. Charles Lohman continued in business at the Liberty Street address as A. M. Mauriceau until his death in 1877, when Ann Lohman’s brother Joseph Trow took on the business over her objections; ads in the columns of the New York Herald on December 23, 1879 tout Mauriceau as at that location for “over 30 years.” Atwater 2400 (this edition).

Price: $250.00