Manuscript draft, “Report of the Mines of the Bradshaw Gold and Silver Mining Company of Arizona.”. Frederick E. Hyde.
Manuscript draft, “Report of the Mines of the Bradshaw Gold and Silver Mining Company of Arizona.”
Manuscript draft, “Report of the Mines of the Bradshaw Gold and Silver Mining Company of Arizona.”

Manuscript draft, “Report of the Mines of the Bradshaw Gold and Silver Mining Company of Arizona.”

Prescott, Arizona Territory, August 14, 1867. 3.5 pages, lined foolscap folio, 12.5 x 7.88 inches, approx. 1000 words. With interpolations and revisions in the text. Some light soiling and wear; a few small stray ink stains; in very good condition considering it seems likely to have survived an ambush. Item #19869

The perils of boom times in the Arizona Territory, Frederick Hyde composes a report of a visit beginning August 9, 1867 to the company’s twelve claims in the Bradshaw District, about 65 miles southeast of the territorial capital of Prescott, Arizona; Hyde’s reports vary from the geologically spare to the report on Sunday, August 11, “from forty to forty-five Indians appearing in the District it was deemed advisable to finish our business immediately & leave the vicinity place. We started about noon as soon as possible, stopping on the way to examine the Great Eastern & Greenwood Lodes.” Hyde reports on the visits to those latter claims that, while undeveloped, they are “however extensive. The lengths we were unable to measure on account of the hurried manner in which the examination was made due to the presence of Indians in the vicinity.” Hyde closes with an optimistic assessment for developing these claims, suited perhaps to wooing investors, given that he soft-pedals to a certain extent the Native American threat to settlers: “ The Indians are yet very troublesome killing [lined through: persons travellers] stealing & driving off the stock from the ranches where it is not watched, and at times coming in force enough to attack and kill the herders.” This was no idle threat; according to a report in the 31 August 1867 issue of the Prescott newspaper Arizona Miner, Hyde’s party left Prescott on August 14 on their way west, when James H. Stimpson and eight others in their party took a detour from Beale Spring for the Sacramento District and were subsequently on 20 August “attacked by a large band of Wallapais, and at the first fire Mr. Stimpson, Edward Yonker and Frank Mesner were killed. . . . Mr. Hyde, whose horse was also shot, made his escape by taking the fleeing mule belonging to Mr. Mesner, who had just fallen.” The Bradshaw Gold and Silver Mining Company despite all this pushed for investors; it had offices in Philadelphia and New York, and a prospectus for investors from 1866 lists the company was under the direction of former U.S. Treasury auditor Green Adams and would seem to suggest that much of the initial exploration of the claims had been done by George M. “Doc” Willing, Jr., the prospector behind the supposed Peralta Land Grant—though Green Adams in that 1866 pamphlet expresses “unlimited confidence” in Willing’s truth and integrity. Hyde (1844-1936) went on graduate in 1874 with a medical degree from Bellevue Hospital and to marry an heiress to a soap fortune; his obituary in the 17 October 1936 Boston Globe notes his tenure as mining company representative in Arizona, where he “was one of five survivors of a party attacked by Hualapi Indians.”.

Price: $650.00

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