Oil Mill 1817 A [autograph wrapper title; autograph title to the inside front wrapper:] Waste Book for the Oil Mill. Oct. 1, 1817. Jairus Winchell.
Oil Mill 1817 A [autograph wrapper title; autograph title to the inside front wrapper:] Waste Book for the Oil Mill. Oct. 1, 1817.
Oil Mill 1817 A [autograph wrapper title; autograph title to the inside front wrapper:] Waste Book for the Oil Mill. Oct. 1, 1817.

Oil Mill 1817 A [autograph wrapper title; autograph title to the inside front wrapper:] Waste Book for the Oil Mill. Oct. 1, 1817.

[Kensington, Berlin, Hartford County, Conn.], September 27, 1817 to May 4, 1818. Original marbled wrappers over sugar paper, blank book ruled in ink, 8.88 x 6.75 inches, 40 pages in autograph ink, stitched with twine. Two contemporary receipts or notes laid in, one pinned in. Some rubbing and nibbling from the spine; some light wear and soil, with a bit of old staining (as if from linseed oil) to the upper wrapper and a few leaves; stitching sprung from the wrappers, though the knot in the text block holds tight; in good condition, quite legible. Item #19922

Evidently Waste Book A, the daily accounts for this Connecticut oil mill; there may be ten to twenty transactions per page, with much on the trade in flaxseed, oil, oilcake, and even salt and wood; the accounts here include three pages in the rear of what seems to be a running list of about 80 flaxseed transactions from various local customers, logging the number of bushels brought in for milling. The notes laid in are made out to Jairus Winchell (1794-1879); per Alexander Winchell’s Genealogy of the Family of Winchell in America (Ann Arbor, 1869), “Jairus was b. in the house where his father Solomon lived, near the mill known as Winchell’s Mill. He spent 18 winters of the 20 previous to 1843, in peddling dry goods in Virginia and Alabama. He represented Berlin in the legislature in 1858.” (He was also a veteran of the War of 1812.) To judge by the accounts here, the daily operation of the mill may have been in the hands of Roswell Moore (1761-1847), who lived in nearby Southington; this would agree with the biographical note per Benjamin Dwight’s History of the Descendants of Elder John Strong, Moore was “a manufacturer of water-cement at Southington, for more than 30 years, and of linseed oil. He was for 14 years a member of the Conn. Legislature.”.

Price: $250.00

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