Item #20492 A Discourse, Delivered at Worcester, Dec. 11, 1825, The Sabbath after the Execution of Horace Carter, for the Crime of Rape . . . Published by Request. Jonathan Going.

A Discourse, Delivered at Worcester, Dec. 11, 1825, The Sabbath after the Execution of Horace Carter, for the Crime of Rape . . . Published by Request.

Worcester: Printed by Wiliam Manning, [1825]. First edition. Unbound self-wrappered pamphlet, 8.5 x 5.5 inches, 22, [2] pages, early added stitching to the spine. Worn, with a few leaves torn touching the text but with no evident loss; some staining and toning; a good, sound copy. Item #20492

“On an ill-fated night, and at an hour when honest industry is enjoying the refreshment of innocent sleep, unhallowed passion, grown rampant by indulgence, is stirred by sudden temptation. Too nearly intoxicated to listen to the now enfeebled voice of natural conscience, or to reflect on the almost certain ruin he was bringing on himself,—he commits a shameless assault on an aged, superannuated woman, a tenant of an alms-house;—the foul offence for which he dies by the hand of public justice!” A moderately uncommon American sermon, with much biographical detail on the sad career of Horace Carter, an illiterate laborer with a history of drunkenness and other crimes, who was convicted of the violent sexual assault of a 75-year-old woman at the poorhouse; much is made of Carter having been put as a child to petty theft by his own mother, of his consorting with harlots, his profanity, etc. Suggestive of the popularity of accounts of violent crime and the circulation of pamphlet literature, this copy bears the bold contemporary ink ownership inscriptions on the title page, “David Whitney Jr’s Property, Read & Return This,” with an additional note along the gutter of the title, “Return this after Reading.” Various men named David Whitney, Jr. were thick on the ground in New England of this period, making provenance a trifle uncertain. Sabin 27702; American Imprints 20687.

Price: $375.00

See all items in Crimes Trials Prisons, Religion
See all items by